Meet Photographer, Mark Peacock, 11/10/19

 

 

Q: How long have you been painting, sculpting, shooting?

A: I’ve been shooting since around the age of 16, but in 2007 started to take them with a more artistic intent. The more I explored and enjoyed street photography it became a passion ultimately resulting in my first solo art show in 2011.

 Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

 A: The greatest personal influence on my love for photography was my father who was an artist and photographer. When I was a kid he used to take me out with him when he would go to photograph anything that caught his eye. Many times this just involved driving around until he saw something and we would stop and he would take his pictures. As my father did this he would point out what it was he was shooting and explain to me how and why he was framing the subject. I would say this really was the only first-hand photography education I ever received and a lot of it stuck.

 Q: What inspired you to get into the arts?

A: I started out as a musician in my late teens playing bass and guitar so music was my first love. I played in various bands for many years and was fully immersed in the creative process with my band mates. In the late 90’s I opened a recording studio with a partner where I composed and produced some albums. It was during the twelve years we had the studio open that I would also do some photography to expand my creativity and ultimately that became more of an artistic pursuit than music.

Q: What was the first work of art you sold?

 A: My first art show ‘Scenes from the Street’ in 2011 was held at the historic art deco Eastern Columbia Building on Broadway in downtown L.A. There were many art collectors that lived in the upper floors of the building and after seeing the show purchased various prints of black and white Los Angeles night photography for their loft apartments.

 Q: Why photography rather than another medium?

 A: I like traveling around and many times this is on my motorcycle. Whether it’s on the road or in the city I’ll see a scene in my mind’s eye that would make a good photograph and I’ll stop and compose a shot. This is why photography became a creative medium for me and it’s something I love to do.

 Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: DSLR digital camera and the images fine-tuned in photoshop.

 Q: What kind of art do you own or show in your house or do you only have your own work displayed?

 A: Oddly enough, I do not have a single print of my own work hanging in my home but when I make a print I always think that it should be something I’d like to hang on my own wall. I have a variety of art work which I purchased over the years consisting of mainly framed prints, some oil paintings, one most notably painted by my father and various lithographs.

Q: What is the philosophy behind your work?

 A: Capturing the ordinary and elevating it to something more than what a particular street scene, building or thing is. That is when it becomes art.

Introducing Raphaele Cohen-Bacry, 9/24/19

Q: How long have you been painting?

A: I started a few years after high school and became really involved in my practice more than 20 years ago.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: My taste evolves all the time, depending on which direction my work takes me. For example, I just re-discovered Alfred Manessier who I think has not received the credit he deserves. I feel the same way about Raoul Dufy that I consider to be a very original artist. I have avidly studied  the works of Jean Dubuffet and Bram Van Velde. Dubuffet because of his never ending creativity and uplifting playfulness, and Bram Van Velde for the opposite.  I like Riopelle a lot, Jonathan Lasker,  the sculptor Belgian Arne Quinze, Louise Nevelson, and here in Los Angeles I pay close attention to Tomory Dodge, among many.

Q: What inspired you to get into the arts?

A: My interests have always been very diverse and I never wanted to limit my mind and curiosity to one area. Everything that helps better understand the mystery of life is fascinating to me. I have always been pursuing arts and sciences at the same time. Both the artist and the scientist  must have a creative mind and there is actually little difference between arts and sciences if you approach them as a way to enrich yourself. For me, they all are means to escape mediocrity. However, being an artist gives me more freedom as I can do it whenever I want, with very little means if necessary. I often feel like an alchemist. I look at my studio and all the paintings, sketches, half done works and so on, and I see a laboratory where I conduct experiments to create images.

Q: What was the first work of art you sold?

A: A nude study made with a piece of rope on canvas (white on white). I still talk to the collector and he still loves it.

Q: Why painting rather than another medium?

A: I am comfortable with all sorts of materials and I enjoy experimenting and pushing the medium as far as I can. I particularly like working on paper. Although I am primarily a painter, I also make sculptures, generally with found objects or unusual material (such as tree bark, gummy bears and marshmallows).

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: Today I am making a lot of collages on paper and canvas and I am researching the best way to make large ones.

Q: Why do you like using acrylic more than oil or watercolor?

A: I cannot say I like it better, and as a matter of fact I used oil for years back in Paris and I think this is unmatchable. But there have been a lot of improvement on acrylic paint and it is getting very close to the results obtained with oil, although it is still lacking the sensuality and mystery achieved with oil paint. I use acrylic mainly for its unique qualities such as resistance and rapidity to dry. It allows me to work on several large paintings at once.

Q: Do you have a message in your work?

A: I had several over the years. It changes  since I am evolving and my work is too. My latest research is about collage. This is an old practice that I always felt was underused or not in a very interesting fashion. What is innovative in the way I approach collages is the fact that I am using pictures of artworks from auction magazines. I tear and assemble images of famous art to create new images of my own. These collages evoke recurrent themes such as the new versus the old, the sublime versus the trivial, the famous versus the obscure. It is a fragmentary process that resembles the method of the archeologist who patiently reconstitutes and reveals a preexistent object, or the way a detective puts clues together to unveil the truth.And this is my way of re-purposing material and paying tribute to artists that came before me. 

Q: What is the philosophy behind your work?

A: I  recently had the chance to meet with 93 year old artist and mathematician Ivan Moscovich. He explained to me that he survived the Holocaust thanks to his creativity. This was a revelation for me as I had questioned for years what makes a person an artist and what motivates her. I now understand that being an artist is an attitude towards life and in some circumstances it can be an escape and a survival skill.

My Interview with Lynne Deutch, 8/23/19

Q.    How long have you been shooting?

A.    Forever! I started drawing as a child, and took up photography when I began traveling as an adult.

Q.    Who are some of your greatest influences?

A.    My Mother.  She was artistic, chic, and stylish which inspired me to design dresses for my paper dolls as a child.  I started art school at the age of 8 which ultimately lead me to pursue fashion and illustration at the Parson School of Art and Design. Two illustrators that influenced my work were Antonio Lopez and David Downton.

Q.    What inspired you to get into the arts?

A.    I don’t think anything inspired me to get into the arts, it just happened.  I followed my talent and my heart.

Q.    What was the first work of art you sold?

A.    A dress Illustration! I must have been about 15 years old when a local dress shop owner gave me an assignment to illustrate a dress for an advertisement in the Akron Beacon Journal. I don’t remember how much I got paid, but it was my first commissioned (and sold) work!

Q.    Why (shooting) rather than another medium?

A.    I see things differently through a lens that I don’t see without and I love to capture that moment.

Q.    What are your favorite materials to work with?

A.    I like to paint in acrylics and draw with charcoal and pastels.  I like to shoot with my iPhone X, but don’t tell anyone.

Q.    What kind of art do you own or show in your house or do you only have your own work displayed?

A.    At home, I surround myself with art – contemporary photography, sculpture, ceramics, and glass, as well as African Art.

Q.    Do you have a message in your work?

A.    There is beauty everywhere and in everything ~ people, landscapes, moments.

Q.What is the philosophy behind your work?

A.   I believe art is primarily a craft, not an intellectual pursuit. I capture moments to show beauty, whether in painting or photography.

Have You Met Painter, Marlene Capell? 4/14/19

Q: How long have you been painting?

A: I have been painting since elementary school where I also did ceramics, weaving and wood working.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: Stonehedge, Mark Rothko, Braque, Matisse and Richard Diebenkorn.

Q: What inspired you to get into the arts?

A: It was always around me. My father started as a photographer. He had a darkroom in our garage. He was a movie studio photographer and then went into the movie theater poster business. He even owned a movie theater.

Q: Why painting rather than other mediums?

A: As soon as I walked into my father’s poster studio and smelled the paint I was hooked on painting and drawing as well. Then in college I took classes where I could use visualization and using my hands to create and build.

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: Oil paint, pencil, paper and collage.

Q: Do you have a message in your work?

A: One message is the idea of striving and resolution.

Q: Why do you like to use oil paint rather than acrylic or watercolor?

A: I prefer oil paint for layering and scraping.

Q: What is the philosophy behind your work?

A: It is a dialogue of discovery. I start with the idea of a portal structure, which evolved from my fascination with Stonehedge and the Lion Gate at Mycenae. It is the starting point of each new piece. I strive to develop an iconic image. I want the image to reveal the history of itself, layer upon layer. It is made from spontaneous gestures in a dialogue with the materials, showing the process, the struggle and attempts at problem solving. I hope for something unexpected to be discovered in each piece for the viewer and myself. This becomes the exchange between the careful rational mind and the desire for spontaneity and a measure of surprise.

Meet Sculptor, Lee Jordan, 3/21/19

Lee Jordan

Q: How long have you been sculpting?

A: I have been sculpting for over 30 years.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: African art, Modigliani, Picasso and Arp.

Q: What was the first work of art you sold?

A: A 4′ x 8′ piece of sheet metal that I had bent and cut with a torch. It sat outside near the ocean and acquired a great rust patina.

Q: Why sculpting rather than another medium?

A: It all had to do with my hands. They wanted to squeeze and shape. Also, I’m not very confident with color.

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: Alabaster, limestone and hardwoods.

Q: What is the philosophy behind your work?

A: My work is mostly abstract and non-representational. They are soothing, gentle and inspirational pieces that are a joy to see and live with. I also love the way that they feel, and encourage people to touch them.

We Are Proud to Introduce Photographer, Howie Ronay, 12/3/18

Q: How long have you been shooting?

A: I’ve been creating as long as I can remember. Remnants remain on my parents’ walls and staircase, providing evidence of just how creative I could be.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: Anyone who has never given up.

Q: What was the first work of art you sold?

A: It’s called “Pot of Gold.” It’s a photograph of a trash can and it was hanging in a sound studio in Austin, Texas but now belongs to Giancarlo Esposito, who played Gus in “Breaking Bad.”

Q: Why shooting rather than another medium?

A: Photography is the medium that allows me to instantly express myself the moment I see a certain dumpster or traffic cone or any “ugly” object int he world that I can find beauty in.

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: I appreciate digital photography because it allows me to nuance and reveal more of the hidden beauty that I find in the objects I shoot.

Q: Do you have a message in your work?

A: When I was 20 years old, I was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s. After a year of treatment, I was blessed with a clean bill of health and a new perspective on life, which manifested in my photography many years later. There is a lot that is ugly in this world but there is beauty to be found too, if we just look for it.

Young Collector’s Club, 11/6/18

       

Today we are proud to highlight these amazing pieces of art for the budget-conscious art lover. The pieces are from left to right:

1. Central Ave #38 by Kymm Swank, 12 x 12

2. Waimea by Justine Stamen Arrillaga, 5.5 x 8 (unframed)

3. The Thinker by Amy Smith, 36 x 36

4. Fire and Ice 3 by Brooke Wilen, available in various sizes

 

Meet Painter, Carla Koulajian, 9/4/18

 

Q: How long have you been painting?

A: I have been painting since 1990, for 28 years.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: I admire all forms of art but I am mostly inspired by De Kooning, Matisse, Cezanne, Basquiat…

Q: What inspired you to get into the arts?

A: I express my thoughts and feelings through my paintings. I started painting at a young age and discovered the world of arts and painting at Art Students League in New York where my art morphed to its present day form.

Q: Why painting rather than another medium?

A: I love the colors and the textures of the oil paints, and I love mixing them and being surprised with the results.

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: My favorite material is oil paint.

Q: What kind of art do you own or show in your house or do you only have your own work displayed?

A: I have two pieces of art that were passed down from my family. They bring back great memories. I also have plenty of my artwork displayed.

Q: Do you have a message in your work?

A: I would like to spread positive energy and a very happy mood through my artwork.

Q: What is the philosophy behind your work?

A: I believe that the colors surrounding us have a very strong influence on us. I work with vivid colors to create a positive energy and a burst of a healing sensation through art.

Getting To Know ADO’s Featured Artist, Melissa McGill, 6/26/18

Q: How long have you been painting?

A: I’ve been painting for the past 3 years. Before that I worked as a commercial collage illustrator.

Q: Who are some of your greatest influences?

A: Helen Frankenthaler, Cy Twombly and Robert Rauschenberg

Q: What inspired you to get into the arts?

A: I cannot point to a specific moment. I’ve always made art, and it’s always brought me joy.

Q: Why painting rather than another medium?

A: I love color, painting gives me an expedient expression of any idea or mood I try to communicate.

Q: What are your favorite materials to work with?

A: Acrylic paint, pastel, graphite, oil sticks and raw canvas and paper

Q: Why kind of art do you own or show in your house or do you only have your own work displayed?

A: I have art from artist friends and a lot of my son’s art. Random assemblages of bits found on travels and photograph memories.

Q: Do you have a message in your work?

A: Overall I hope my work inspires others and makes a connection.

 

Young Collector’s Club, 6/20/18

Today we are proud to showcase these 4 fantastic pieces all priced at $2,000 or less. From left to right they are:

1. Central Ave #18, Kymm Swank, 24 x 24, acrylic, spray paint & lacquer on wood panel, $1,200 or 60/month.

2. The Painter, Marisa Murrow, 24 x 12, oil on canvas, $2,000 or 100/month.

3. Wild Horses, Ashley Prikryl, 16 x 20 (paper size), $950 framed or 47.50/month (additional sizes available).

4. Meander in the Garden, Lynda Pizzuto, 24 x 24, oil on canvas, $1,800 or 90/month.